A Travellerspoint blog

The End

Happy to be going home. Honest.


View October 2011- July 2012 on Laura Mitchell's travel map.

So my trip has come to an end now after 7 months of being away from home. I finished off with a final couple of weeks in Auckland where I have been lucky to be able to stay with Amy and Dan again. I have spent alot of my time whiling away the hours on their sunny deck with daisy the dog, and also doing a couple of things I missed first time round in Auckland; like visiting the sky tower- awesome views of the city interspersed with random people jumping off the top (as it wouldn’t be New Zealand if someone wasn’t jumping off something) and going to Piha beach.

View Of Auckland Harbour Bridge From The Sky Tower

View Of Auckland Harbour Bridge From The Sky Tower

Piha Beach With Daisy The Dog

Piha Beach With Daisy The Dog

I also took Ron to the car market where I sold him after 8763km of faithful service (an emotional goodbye, especially since the Chinese backpacker I sold him to didn’t really understand that I wanted him to carry on calling the car Ron). Though to be honest I’m pretty happy I managed to sell him as there are a lot of desperate backpackers around trying to sell their cars, and not many buyers (I put up posters in about 10 hostels and didn’t hear anything back, and only managed to sell Ron at the car market in the last 10 minutes). But Ron didn’t break down (despite some worrying moments of randomly cutting out at traffic lights) and I sold him for the same as what I paid for him, so all in all, he was a good deal.

Bye Ron! <img class='img' src='http://www.travellerspoint.com/Emoticons/icon_sad.gif' width='15' height='15' alt=':(' title='' />

Bye Ron! :(

Now all my loose ends are tied up, I have ticked off everything on my "things to do whilst travelling" list and I’m really looking forward to going home. I think I will miss travelling as you get to do so many awesome things and meet loads of cool people. However there are a few things I’m not going to miss:

  • Public enemy number 1: The Sand fly
  • Public enemy number 2: The Snoring Backpacker
  • Constant worry the car will break down and not having Dad there to fix it
  • Random panics about the location of my passport, even though it’s been in the same place for 7 months
  • Being freezing cold and remembering all the warm clothes you left at home because "it’s summer in New Zealand"
  • Getting constant blank looks when you say you are from Guernsey
  • Paying someone an obscene amount of money to jump off something or to go see something cool, and then getting charged even more to get the photos of it afterwards
  • Sharing poorly equipped kitchens with a lot of other people and having to take shifts on who gets a knife and fork (this may be a slight exaggeration)
  • Not being able to buy anything that won’t be able to fit in your already full backpack
  • Constantly wearing the same clothes, no matter how shabby they have become
  • Paying a lot of money to use rubbish slow internet
  • Constantly being told that 2012 was the worst summer in New Zealand for years

However these small annoyances are nothing compared to the good bits of travelling, and I only need to look back on this blog to see all the awesome things I have had the opportunity to do. So in summary, I have had a great time away, but I am genuinely looking forward to going back, not constantly being on the move, having the comforts of home, sleeping in my own bed and especially seeing all the people I have missed.

Not looking forward to the long flight back though.

Posted by Laura Mitchell 21:07 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

Finishing Off The South And Back Through The North

Wine, Ferry, Art-Deco, Rain, Volcano, Zorb, Surf, Done


View October 2011- July 2012 on Laura Mitchell's travel map.

So over the past couple of weeks I have been gradually making my way north, back to Auckland to fly out in May. I haven’t written a blog in a little while so rather than go day by day I will just mention the highlights from each place I visited:

Blenheim:
A town full of wineries and not much else; I only spent one full day here where I rocked up in the morning and immediately booked myself on to a wine tour. It was really enjoyable as you just get driven round in a minibus with a group of people drinking lots of nice wine in pretty places (what’s not to like). I bought one bottle of wine out of guilt (you can’t help but compare the prices to Pak’N’Save ) and actually spent more in the chocolate shop we visited than in the wineries (in my defence it was REALLY good chocolate, and it was Easter time so its allowed). In the evening I completed my day of decadence by going out for a nice meal with the girls I made friends with on the tour (not really a good move for a backpacker running out of money, but they were all on holiday and sucked me into their casual “we’re on holiday let’s spend loads of money” attitude.) One day of excess is allowed though…

One of Blenheims Many Wineries

One of Blenheims Many Wineries

Picton:
I spent the Easter weekend in Picton which was beautiful weather so just spent most my time doing the walks in surrounding area (walking is free so made up for my excess in Blenheim, see it all works out). My hostel was really nice as well (they gave out free hot scones in the morning, so really you can forgive them for anything else) so I had a nice couple of days chilling out before my ferry.

View Of The Ferry In Picton

View Of The Ferry In Picton

Wellington:
I only stayed one night in Wellington to visit Tracy (one of the Irish girls I was travelling with) where the sum total of my activity was getting lost in the city trying to find Tracy’s hostel (I stayed the night for free there as she has her own room being a long termer, so I just had to walk in and pretend like I belonged and didn’t get asked any questions) getting Domino’s pizza (its $4.90 on a Tuesday which is like £2.50 for a large pizza so how can you say no?) and then getting up at 6am to move my car as parking in the centre of a city sucks.

Napier:
Napier wasn’t excessively exciting as its main attraction was the fact that it had lots of art-deco buildings (I still don’t know exactly what art-deco is, but apparently there was a lot of it in Napier). I did however see my first Kiwi bird (in the aquarium randomly), so it was worth visiting as I was starting to worry I would leave New Zealand without seeing one.

Art-Deco??

Art-Deco??

Gisborne:
Nothing to say about Gisborne, it rained loads and all I did was wait in Pak’N’Save for it to stop as I forgot to bring my coat, then went back to the hostel to watch movies, then left in the morning. Even if it didn’t rain I don’t reckon there would be much to do there…

Whakatane:
The main attraction here was White Island – An active volcano out to sea. My visit involved a 1.5 hour boat trip out to the island, a dodgy transfer in a dinghy in quite rough swell (we had a few near misses with people falling in the sea, one girl actually slipped and started to fall backwards out the dinghy till one of the crew on the main boat jumped over and pushed her back in with his momentum, it was quite impressive), an hour tour round the island (complete with small risk of eruption/landslides, gas masks, an old abandoned sulphur mining factory, bad smelling acid steam and other joys of volcanos), another dodgy transfer back to the boat (I was actually quite surprised/mildly disappointed no one fell in), lunch, and a 1.5 hour boat trip back (by which time I was quite sea sick, so wasn’t excessively enjoyable). The volcano itself was pretty cool to see and the tour was good, but it was a bit of an effort to get out there (though luckily we had a nice day so it could have been a much worse crossing I guess)

At White Island Fully Kitted Out In Gas Mask And Helmet

At White Island Fully Kitted Out In Gas Mask And Helmet

Rotorua –
I didn’t actually stay the night here (as had been here before), but stopped off to try Zorbing; which involves filling up a big plastic ball with some water (obviously not to the top, just enough to get you very wet and make sure you slip around loads), diving head first through a little tunnel to get into it, zipping it shut, then getting pushed down a hill on a zig zag track. They tell you to walk towards the edge (like a hamster ball) and I was determined to stay up and run for a bit but literally fell over within one step and went rolling off down the hill. It was awesome fun, though really just felt like a cool water slide, which makes it one of the most expensive water slides of your life ($60 for one go, which is like £32). Still, you have to do these things at least once!

Zorb Track

Zorb Track

Raglan –
Raglan was my last stop before Auckland and it was pretty cool! The hostel was very chilled out and awesome (hammocks, a slack line, a double bed, surf boards for hire and right on the water front) and the surfing beach was only a 5 minute drive away. So after a chilled out morning in a hammock and a brief expedition out of town to go tow a van (Ron’s tow bar finally had its use), I headed down to the surfing beach for the afternoon and got well and truly destroyed (the waves seemed to be really perfect sizes until I attempted to paddle out, when they would get massive and break right on top of me to destroy all my hard work of trying to get far enough out to surf). Still it was really nice being in the sea, and I did manage some ungraceful standing up which resembled surfing. It has definitely encouraged me to dig my surfboard out the shed when I get home.

Surf Beach In Raglan

Surf Beach In Raglan

Now I am back in Auckland staying with Amy and Dan for a couple of weeks, to sort through my accumulated crap, sell Ron :( and generally prepare to go back to real life (and sit out on the deck in the sun as Im still on holiday :) )

Posted by Laura Mitchell 16:25 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

Dusky Dolphins and Sperm Whales in Kaikoura

5am Starts, Dolphins by Water, Whales by Sky


View October 2011- July 2012 on Laura Mitchell's travel map.

Today ends my short stay in Kaikoura and it has surpassed expectations! After I arrived and settled into my room/ate my tea/met some strangers, my first act in Kaikoura was to head to another pub quiz (the only form of education available whilst travelling); though this quiz was a little different to the last one we took part in. First of all we were all travellers, so we were on pretty even grounds general knowledge wise (no locals who come to pub quizzes every week) and the rounds were slightly out of the ordinaray (General Knowledge, Music and World Capitals was regaular enough, but then they tacked on Alcohol, Sex and Plasticine porn scene rounds), finally we had the added benefit of being able to understand the scottish guy reading out the questions. We performed pretty well and actually managed to win! Possibly my proudest moment in life. We won a $30 bar tab, which between 5 didnt get us much, but it didnt matter, it's the pride that counts.

My first full day in Kaikoura was nice enough, but relatively uneventful. I filled my time wandering around the area and doing a walk along the Peninsula. It was a pretty nice walk, clear skies, cows in the fields, seals in their colonies, birds in their sky and tourists in their campervans. I then headed back into town and booked a dolphin tour for 5.30am the next day (dedication) and a whale watch helicopter flight for 11am (which was pretty expensive at $220 for 30 mins, but I had never been in a helicopter so felt it was worth it to get another life tick). I then went back to the hostel and desperately tried to block out how much money I had been spending, and had an early night in preparation for my early morning.

The Peninsula I walked from above

The Peninsula I walked from above

At 5.00am I excited the room with some stealth (I was even awake before my alarm so no annoying the 3 other people in my room) and started to regret booking the tour so early as it was pitch dark and freezing cold (not ideal conditions when you know you have to get in the cold sea). But once I got over the inital pain of getting up so early, it wasnt so bad. I went to the Dolphin Encounter centre and got wetsuited up with the other 15 swimmers and by the time we headed out on the boat the sun was starting to come up. It was pretty nice being out to sea so early, and I settled down in my seat preparing for a long wait to find dolphins (I had been told there was a 99% chance of finding dolphins, but I had been told this before, and memories of driving round for 4 hours in the Bay of Islands without a single dolphin was fresh in my mind).

But after what seemed to be about 10 minutes we were driving in a pod of hundreds of dolphins. It was amazing. Soon enough we had our masks and snorkels on and were perched on the back of the boat (feet in the freezing cold water, dreading jumping into the cold) however when it was time to jump in, we were so focussed on swimming towards the dolphins that you dont really notice you're cold. The first swim was slightly off putting as you were swimming through quite murky water not really seeing anything then suddenly a dolphin would swim right in front of your face. however I soon got used to it and it was great! so many dolphins swimming round you whilst you spin in a circle trying to keep up with them, fantastic. Each time the main body of the pod had gone past, we would hop back on the boat, follow them, then get in again.

Swimmers arranging themselves on the back of boat

Swimmers arranging themselves on the back of boat

We did this about 4 times; by which time I was knackered from swimming in circles as fast as I could and swimming quite far from the boat (I tried to hang outside the group of main swimmers to avoid getting a fin to the face). Each swim seemed to be better than the last with more dolpnins and clearer water. They were just everywhere! After our final swim we all got back on the boat, put some warm water down our wetsuits using the hot shower hoses (which felt amazing), got changed into warm clothes, had some hot chocolate and biscuits and then watched the dolphins playing and "socialising" with each other from the boat. We got to see them doing sommersaults, backflips, jumps and generally speeding round in the water. After we had our fill of dolphin activity we headed back to the shore. An absolutely amazing morning, definitely up there in the best things I have done whilst travelling, I enjoyed every second.

Do A Flip!

Do A Flip!

Dusky Dolphins swimming in front of the boat

Dusky Dolphins swimming in front of the boat

I then returned back to the hostel feeling like I had had a full day, and it was only 9am! So I waited around at a loose end for a couple of hours to go on my helicopter tour and then went via the shortcut I found the previous day (through a hole in the wire fence and hopping over some train tracks). We took off about 11.30am and flew over the Peninsula I had walked the day before (it looked nicer from the air) and out to sea. It was a perfect weather with amazing views and within the first 10 minutes we saw 2 sperm whales! Awesome. Both of them were on the surface for a few mins whilst we hovered over them and then made a dive down (putting their tails in the air in the classic photos you see). After that we didnt see any more whales (as there was only 2 known to be in the area at the time, and we had just seen them dive underwater!) but we saw more dolphins, some albatross (though they just looked like sea gulls as we were so far away, but if you compared them to the surrounding birds they were pretty massive!) and some awesome views. We then headed back, flying over the peninsula again with nice views of Kaikoura and the mountains in the background, and landed.

Whales Looking Pretty Small From Above

Whales Looking Pretty Small From Above

Sperm Whale from Above

Sperm Whale from Above

Go for a ride in a helicopter. Tick.

Go for a ride in a helicopter. Tick.

And that brings my day in Kaikoura to an end (well of anything interesting, unless you want to know about my nap, or doing my laundry). I had a fantastic stay and definitely pleased I had such a prefect day to do my marine wildlife tours. Tomorrow I am headed to Blenheim, which probably wont be as memorable as here, but there are alot of wineries about, so Im sure I can occupy my time :)

Posted by Laura Mitchell 21:06 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

Mount Cook, Christchurch and Arthurs Pass

Mountain, City, Rocks, Caves


View October 2011- July 2012 on Laura Mitchell's travel map.

After Dunedin I made my way up North and inland to the Mount Cook township. The drive up was scenic as always (taking it a bit for granted now) though the most notable section was driving past Lake Pukaki, which was just unbelievably blue. I had to stop and take a picture as it was getting a bit dangerous driving on the road whilst trying to take in the scenery (you could see other people driving, gently swerving to one side then making a quick recovery, clearly having similar problems taking their eyes off the lake). Anyway I took a picture but it still doesnt really do it justice...

Ron checking out the view at Lake Pukaki

Ron checking out the view at Lake Pukaki

A little way further and I was at Mount Cook Village, though village is a bit misleading... There is just a few buildings set with an amazing mountain range backdrop, no shops (luckily thought that would be the case and stocked up on food), and complete with expensive hostel. It was worth it though, as the full day I was there the weather was fanstic, perfectly sunny and clear with amazing views of the moutains. I spent the day wandering up Hooker Valley, Over a couple of swing bridges, up a river to a lake with floating ice, where I sat and had lunch with a perfect view of Mount Cook listening to the occassional avalanche. I then headed back and spent the rest of the day chilling out in the sun and watching comedy Kiwi films in the evening.

In Hooker Valley With Mount Cook in the Background

In Hooker Valley With Mount Cook in the Background


Mountains and Lakes

Mountains and Lakes

The next day I headed to Christchurch where I had a bit of trouble trying to get in the same hostel as Emma and Tracey (as most of the other hostels have fallen down) but in the end prevailed and checked into "Foley Towers" which was very central (i.e. right next to the red zone and infuriating trying to find it in the car with all the closed roads and one way systems). I spent the rest of the day wandering round looking at the destruction (The whole center has been shut off and all the buildings deserted, you can get a pretty big fine for walking round in the red zone) but also taking in the new stuff (a cluster of shops built inside shipping containers) and enjoying the park/botanical gardens which didnt seem to be affected at all. In the evening we experienced Christchurch's now extremely limited nightlife (there is about 3 places you can go within walking distance of the centre) one of which was the Casino, where we spent the majority of our time (not gambling, but enjoying the live music in the attached bar). Unfortuantly our night out lead to a bit of a waste of the next day where my crowning achievments of the day were walking to the library to use the free internet and falling asleep in the garden.

Deserted Christchurch Centre (The Red Zone)

Deserted Christchurch Centre (The Red Zone)

Our final day in Christchurch we actually spent in Akaroa, a small french settlement about an hour drive out of Christchurch, which was quite pretty but very small. We spent the day doing things like going to the small craft fair, buying home made fudge, eating a pub lunch and wandering along the waterfront with hoards of other people (who I assume came off the cruise ship sitting out in the harbour). It made us all feel a bit like retired people, though it was pretty relaxing. We then drove home and had another wild night in Christchurch which involved sitting in our room watching a film. good stuff.

The next day the three of us all went our seperate ways and I headed inland to Arthurs Pass. ANOTHER pretty drive with some pretty cool stops. First of which was Castle Hill, an area with some impressive rock formations known for its climbing. I got out the car and optimistically packed all my climbing gear hoping to find some people to join, but after wandering round I dissapointingly only found lots of Asian tourists taking photos. So instead I had to content myself with walking/scrambling round the warren of rocks and eating lunch in a cool nook overlooking the area.

Castel Hill (well some of it, much more on the other side of the camera)

Castel Hill (well some of it, much more on the other side of the camera)

The next stop was the Cave Stream Scenic Reserve;
"The cave passage meanders and twists in pitch darkness for 362 metres between the two entrances. The cave ends in a deep pool with a 3-metre high waterfall. A ladder of iron rungs in the rock climbs up beside the waterfall and a chain and step help the crawl along the overhang ledge to the exit. If care is taken, fit, inexperienced cavers can go through"

I considered myself as a "fit, inexperienced caver" so thought this sounded like my kind of thing. I was prepared roll up my trousers and to get my shoes wet, but when I rocked up and saw a group of people about to go in in wesuits, boots and helmets I felt mildly unprepared. Another group of people were also sitting round drinking hot drinks talking about how freezing it was which was putting me off more and more by the second, they also informed me that the water would in fact go up to my waist. So after a quick clothing change (surf shorts and couple of merino wool layers) I sped down to start off (I wanted to go ahead of the group in wetsuits in case I got into trouble then they could rescue me) but really other than being very cold and very dark (my headtorch seemed woefully inadequate at the beginning) it was pretty safe there was nothing too challenging, just the odd small waterfall to step up and the odd hidden rock to fall over (though I was desperate to stay upright to keep my camera dry and not lose my car key which I very much regretted bringing). After about 30mins I emerged back into day light pretty pleased that I had braved the cold (it wasnt that bad as the majority of your upper body stays dry) and then headed on my way (with the only disadvantage being that my only pair of shoes was soaking wet, and are still wet now).

A section of the Cave Stream Walk

A section of the Cave Stream Walk

The rest of the way to Arthurs Pass was pretty uneventful, and I set up for the night in a YHA hostel, where I met a host of other friendly people (Polish, Spanish, English, Italian and German, we were very muticultural...though no-one had heard of Guernsey. Standard.) and spent a cosy night by the fire (which Im glad we lit, as it was freezing outside when I went to recieve my still soaking shoes from the clothes line). The next day a few of us went for a short walk up to a near by waterfall and then we all set off on our seperate ways.

I then made the Long drive to Kaikoura, which was nothing special scenery wise, and now I am booked into a hostel here for a couple of days hoping to explore the area and probably do a dolphin tour (hopefully I will have more luck than the Bay of Islands!)

Posted by Laura Mitchell 22:51 Archived in New Zealand Comments (0)

Milford Sound and Dunedin

Storms, Waterfalls, West To East, Chocolate, Seal Attack, Struggling Up Sand, Steep Roads, Butterflies


View October 2011- July 2012 on Laura Mitchell's travel map.

After Queenstown Tracy, Emma and I set off on the long drive to Milford Sound. The drive was OK, quite picturesque, but couldn't help but feel wrong about driving straight towards the dark rainy area in front of us when it was so sunny and nice back the way we came. It rained nearly the whole time we were in Milford, alternating between pelting rain in hardcore storms (causing power cuts and everything) to gentle showers, I had never been more glad to not be camping. On the day of our boat tour the wind was so bad in the morning that everything was getting canceled, however it calmed down in the afternoon and luckily we had booked the latest tour; so we were all good (we even had 10 minutes of sun at the end). So we headed out for our cruise and enjoyed the scenery whilst getting told some Milford related facts (Milford Sound is actually a fjord not a sound (a fjord is made by a glacier, a sound is made by a river), Milford only has 2 permanent waterfalls (there were thousands when we were there because of all the rain), 9 days without rain is considered a drought (which doesn't happen very often) and such like). Even though it was grey and overcast, the scenery was still pretty beautiful, and we got to stand underneath a waterfall (they told us to go outside and have a "once in a lifetime experience" of standing near such a big waterfall, and I laughed to myself thinking clearly these people have never been canyoning in Wanaka). The next day we headed off, glad we visited, but happy to get away from the rain and the millions of sand-flies.

Milford Sound

Milford Sound

We then spent the day driving from West to East to Dunedin (an uneventful, but LONG drive) and set up base at Penny's hostel. Our first full day in Dunedin involved a wander round the town, and then a trip to the Cadbury factory. The tour itself was relatively interesting, but really we were there for the free chocolate we got given at random points of the tour. Other than seeing the factory (and getting the idea that working in the factory would be awful as everyone walking round looked miserable, not like the jolly characters in the information dvd we watched at the beginning at all) we also got to watch a ton of chocolate fall out the ceiling (I don't know who thought that was a valuable addition to the tour, a waste of chocolate in my opinion, and actually quite alarming as I was expecting a nice gentle waterfall, when actually it THUNDERED down the chute). All in all it was a well worthwhile tour and would recommend it to anyone visiting Dunedin, and even though we had been given lots of free chocolate, we then proceeded to the shop to buy lots MORE chocolate (at actually very reasonable prices). To save ourselves sitting inside eating chocolate until we were sick, we decided that evening to go to a local pub quiz, where we put in a stellar performance and came joint second last out of 19, showing a University education is just not sufficient to perform well in life.

Our First Free Chocolate Bar and the Attractive Hair Nets You Have To Wear Round The Factory

Our First Free Chocolate Bar and the Attractive Hair Nets You Have To Wear Round The Factory

Small Selection Of Chocolate Bars In The Shop After The Tour

Small Selection Of Chocolate Bars In The Shop After The Tour

The following day Emma and Tracy had a tour booked on a scenic railway, which I wasn't excessively keen to join for the price (they had a voucher) so I decided to walk off some of the chocolate and go to Otago Peninsula to check out the walking trails. I headed to Sandymount reserve and walked along the cliffs (I spied some climbers on some epic looking routes, and watched them for a while as I was interested to see what they would do when they got to the massive section of choss, but after about 15mins I lost interest and headed on my way). I then reached a sign which said Sandfly bay (I tried not to get put off by the name) was a mere 2.5km walk away, so decided to give that a visit, however I didn't expect to walk all that way over sand dunes; It was OK on the walk down, but walking uphill in the sand was way less fun; though it was still a really pretty walk.

Ron Enjoying The View At Otago Peninsula

Ron Enjoying The View At Otago Peninsula

Once I arrived at the beach I strolled down the sand and came across a seal lying on the beach. lovely, I thought, I will take a picture, oh its moving, that's nice I can take a picture of a sitting up seal, that will be much better. Then it promptly put on a mean face and RAN at me, which was actually quite terrifying. I made a bit of an undignified yelp and ran off it the opposite direction (luckily I am much more agile on land than a seal). Anyway I retreated to what I thought was a safe distance to sit on a bit of driftwood, and was just contemplating eating my lunch when out the corner of my eye I saw the same seal running down the beach towards me (taking regular breaks to collapse in the sand for a few seconds every now and then). I could see that I had gained an enemy, so I decided to go further down the beach to get out of sight, so I started to walk with one eye over my shoulder when I practically tripped over another seal which looked exactly like a sandy piece of wood until it MOVED when I was right next to it. Needless to say I backed off pretty quick (more stumbled backwards in surprise as it was HUGE) and decided I wanted to get off the beach...(which involved dodging past the original seal). Once I was safely out of attack range, I sat on the sand dunes and watched the amusing sight of other people making the same mistake I had (one boy was actually kneeling next to a docile seal getting his friends to take a picture when it jumped up surprisingly quick and started towards him; his reaction was pretty comical).

Seal Attack!

Seal Attack!

Anyway after I had my fill of comedy, I started back up the sand dunes, which was mildly soul destroying. It took me FOREVER as you just cant travel efficiently uphill in sand, a few times I wanted to collapse and shout "Go on without me!" but there was no-one to listen to my dramatics, so instead I put "Eye of the Tiger" on my Ipod for motivation and kept trudging on (I didn't want to go too slow in case the seal was still following me)... Eventually I made it to the top and drove home (via the albatross center, where I didn't actually see an albatross), feeling like I definitely worked off some of my chocolate.

Uphill Mission (All Sand) To Get Back To The Car

Uphill Mission (All Sand) To Get Back To The Car

Our Final full day in Dunedin involved jamming in some other tourist attractions; mainly visiting Baldwin street; The steepest street in the world (though after the sand struggle, walking up that street was nothing) and also a brief visit to the Botanical gardens (though we spent the majority of our time there playing in the kids playground and admiring the ducks).

Steepest Street In The World (Baldwin Street)

Steepest Street In The World (Baldwin Street)

At lunch (after Emma and Tracy had caught their bus to Christchurch) I headed to the Museum, as I had heard there was an impressive room full of butterflies there. I ignored all the other exhibits (I didnt feel I had a sufficient attention span to wander round the whole museum, or learn anything) and headed straight to the tropical gardens, where I enjoyed being surrounded with butterflies, small birds and the odd turtle. I also allowed myself a wander round to look at all the stuffed animals and came across a giant Japanese Spider Crab, which looked terrifying; Martin was lucky my camera had run out of battery by this point, else he would have a horrifying photo on his facebook page.

Flutter-Bys

Flutter-Bys

After today I feel like I have done a sufficient amount of tourist activities to justify moving on, so tomorrow I will hopefully make my way to Mount Cook, to get out of the city and back to some picturesque mountains!

Posted by Laura Mitchell 20:32 Archived in New Zealand Comments (1)

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